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Rethinking Levels 1 & 2

Are we keeping students in levels 1 and 2 for too long? Our Reading Recovery Teacher Leader had us mull over this question during a Reading Recovery professional development session. I am still reflecting on this question. The majority of my incoming Reading Recovery students start in levels 0-1. I know that I need to …

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Cross-checking Sources of Information

Literacy Pages: The Series presents the fifth post in an 8-post series related to Reading Recovery and Teaching with Discontinuation in Mind from Early Lessons. Cross-checking is the behavior in which a student checks one or more sources of information against each other. The act of cross-checking can lead to a self-correction in which all …

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Part 3: Syntactic Structures

Literacy Pages: The Series presents the forth post in an 8-post series related to Reading Recovery and Teaching with Discontinuation in Mind from Early Lessons. Click below to check out our previous post. Self-Extending Systems: Teaching with Discontinuation and Independence in Mind Part 1: Actively Self-monitoring Part 2: Searching for Different Kinds of Information When …

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Part 1: Actively Self-monitoring

Literacy Pages: The Series presents the second post in an 8-part series related to Reading Recovery and Teaching with Discontinuation in Mind from Early Lessons. Click below to check out our previous post. Self-Extending Systems: Teaching with Discontinuation and Independence in Mind Self-monitoring is an integral ability needed by students in order for them to …

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Teachers Cannot Teach Independence

In Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals (2016), Marie Clay writes that teachers do not need to know how to teach students independence and that we in fact cannot teach a child independence (p. 41). Instead, through less teacher talk, more observing, and careful book selections we can set students up for independently initiating their own …

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Tackling Vowels Within a Complex Theory of Reading

Thank you Maggie @GoReadBooks for suggesting this blog post! As we know, many of the letters in the English language have multiple sounds associated with them. Vowels sounds, in particular, can be quite tricky for some students to learn. My stance is that while learning vowel sounds is important, children should not be held back …

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Don’t Teach Strategies: Searching, Self-correcting & Confirming (part 2)

In part 1 we explored the idea of teaching strategies versus teaching for strategic activity and looked closely at self-monitoring and cross-checking.  In part 2 we will continue to explore the notion of helping our students build an effective processing system. "Decision processes that happen in the head" will serve as my overly simplified definition of …

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Reading Recovery: The Importance of Notetaking

Lesson records are a vital piece of our planning during a Reading Recovery series of lessons. In her article, What Do Lesson Records Have to Do with Effective Reading Recovery Teaching?, Sharan Gibson explains that the purpose of lesson records is "to ensure that our instruction is tailored to each student's needs" (p. 24). Detailed and …

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Running Records: Frequently Asked Questions

While browsing through various literacy Facebook Groups I have noticed similar questions asked about running records.   I started gathering questions so that I could eventually address them all in one post. The answers I have provided come from my trusted sources: Marie Clay (the creator of running records) and Fountas & Pinnell (who provide us …

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Teaching for Comprehending During Guided Reading

Here is some food for thought, “Comprehending is an active, meaning-making process, not simply an isolated outcome or product after reading” (Fountas & Pinnell, 2017, p. 469). It is important that we do not fall into the trap of asking a list of questions after a child reads a book and think that is sufficient …

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